Chris Somerville: Thesis Paper Outline

Articles, Journals and Books:


  • “[The]… internet supports communication at a distance, it allows for a degree of anonymity which, while it removes the barriers to engagement, can lead to destructive or reckless behavior.”Niel Mclean, “Physical Metaphors For Digital Safety”, A Provocation Paper written for Nominet Trust, 5

  • “…there is also clear and well-documented evidence of problematic over-use of the internet, which impacts negatively on well-being.” Valkenburg, P. M., Peter, J. & Schouten, A. P. Friend networking sites and their relationship to adolescents’ well-being and social self-esteem. Cyberpsychology and Behavior 9, 584–590. (2006).

  • “This includes participating in cyber-bullying, harassing or persuading others into harmful activity, anti-social behavior such as posting offensive messages, and engaging in illegal activity such as unauthorized file sharing or downloading copyright protected material.” Niel Mclean, “Physical Metaphors For Digital Safety”, A Provocation Paper written for Nominet Trust, 5

  • “Motivation, incentive, risk and reward are deeply entwined. For the ballet dancer that finished the performance on broken toes, the risks of stopping (damage to her immediate career) outweighed the risk of longer term damage. The danger of course is that, without proper reflection, in the heat of the moment the available immediate risks dominate. This way of thinking has become increasingly popular with the success of books such as ‘Freakanomics.’ The essential idea is that what can from the outside appear as irrational behavior becomes completely rational once motivations and incentives are properly understood. Many young peoples motivations relate to notions of identity, how they are perceived within their community, how they wish to be, and the relationship between the two. The pursuit of authenticity is a powerful driver, of being true to yourself, not selling out, keeping it real, and not being a poseur or fake, to use phrases from the past 40 years. Of course this sits badly with a period in young peoples development when they most need to experiment, to explore who they are, to develop their private sense of self while living highly public online lives. Helping young people to adopt effective strategies around managing their online identities might be a significant step towards ensuring they protect both their current and future selves as they grow up in public.” Niel Mclean, “Physical Metaphors For Digital Safety”, A Provocation Paper written for Nominet Trust, 12

  • “According to Jung, the individuation process involves the separation of the ego from the self and the eventual return or reunion of the ego and the self in later life. In the first stage of development, the ego and the self are one. The child below the age of two cannot usually distinguish between self and other. In psychiatric terminology, this is referred to as a stage of inflation, but symboli- cally it represents an original wholeness in which all is unconsciousness. In literature, this original age of mankind is characterized by the legend of the Golden Age or by the story of the Garden of Eden before the apple of conscious- ness was eaten from the Tree of Knowledge. At this stage, Jung argues, the self is experienced as a deity.” Robert N. St. Clair, “Visual Metaphor, Cultural Knowledge, and the New Rhetoric,”95

  • An ego-driven psyche, as claimed by researchers, will make decisions for their own personal gain and not consider the impact of their decisions on others. Valkenburg, P. M., Peter, J. & Schouten, A. P. Friend networking sites and their relationship to adolescents’ well-being and social self-esteem. Cyberpsychology and Behavior 9, 584–590. (2006).

  • “When Aristotle presented his answer to the problematic nature of physis in Greek culture, he used the natural metaphor of growth as his way of explaining why and how change occurs. The material cause is where growth begins, and the final cause (telos) is where it ends. In the transition from the beginning to the end is the alteration of forms, the formal cause. But change has to be connected for a purpose and underlying reason.” Robert N. St. Clair, “Visual Metaphor, Cultural Knowledge, and the New Rhetoric,”93

  • “…The qualitative difference between hyperspace and more passive screen environments (television and film, for example) lies in the celebration of the journey itself. In the interactive environments, the promenades – and its implicit digressions – are as important as the destination. Jessica Helfand, “Virtuality, Dematerialization of Screen Space,” Screen, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, New York, 2001, p38

  • “…If the viewer moves through the information, and the information itself is moving, it is this kinetic activity – this act of moving – that circumscribes our perception, dominates our senses, and becomes, in a very noticeable sense, the new prevailing aesthetic.” Jessica Helfand, “Virtuality, Teasing the Nerves, The Art of Technological Persuasion,” Screen, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, New York, 2001, p29